Why Is There Water Leaking from My AC System?

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  3. Why Is There Water Leaking from My AC System?

One of the most common emergency phone calls we get for AC repair is about water leaking from the air conditioning unit. When this happens, you need technicians to act fast. The leaking water could cause damage and may even lead to the growth and spread of mold.

But as a homeowner, you want to know, “Why did the water leak in the first place? Is there something I can do to prevent it?” We’ll tell you more below!

The Condensate Drainage System

Water is not needed to run your air conditioner. Rather, water naturally collects as part of the cooling process, particularly if you live in a humid area. Condensation builds up on the cold evaporator coil inside of your AC system as warm humid air blows by. This typically drips out to a tray that angles toward a condensate pipe so that water drains safely away from the home.

When Water Overflows

There are a few different reasons water could overflow into your home from the condensate drain.

  • The tray isn’t positioned properly. It could have been knocked out of place, somehow. Or, installers might not have put it in the ideal position to catch the condensate properly.
  • The drain is clogged. Dirt and debris can get into the condensate drain pipe and force water to overflow to the home.
  • You need a condensate pump. In some cases, you need a pump to help move water out of the system.

Prevent Drainage Issues

Scheduling maintenance for your air conditioner can help to prevent a lot of problems, such as those that result in water leaking from the indoor unit. Your technicians should check the drain for clogs and look for any other signs that water is not draining properly. A tune-up also helps the system to run more efficiently, which is something we could all use.

Give AC Designs Inc. a call for AC repairs in Jacksonville, FL. We will deliver above your expectations!

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